blackhistorytheremix:

Twenty years before NWA screamed “Fuck tha Police” Marsha P. Johnson was in the streets of New York throwing shoes at them (so the story goes). Marsha P. Johnson (June 27, 1944 – July 6, 1992) aka “the Saint of Christopher Street” was an iconic trans* rights activist. She was a leader in the resistance against police harassment in what we know as the Stonewall Riots. She also was the cofounder of Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries (S.T.A.R.)

blackhistorytheremix:

Twenty years before NWA screamed “Fuck tha Police” Marsha P. Johnson was in the streets of New York throwing shoes at them (so the story goes). Marsha P. Johnson (June 27, 1944 – July 6, 1992) aka “the Saint of Christopher Street” was an iconic trans* rights activist. She was a leader in the resistance against police harassment in what we know as the Stonewall Riots. She also was the cofounder of Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries (S.T.A.R.)

5,122 notes

gradientlair:

janetmock:

Spending the weekend in Sarasota with bell hooks who pushed me to take time off — even just for two days.
"You and that phone, girl. Who are you texting with? No, it’s the camera! I’m not going to smile." -bell hooks

Wow. ❤

gradientlair:

janetmock:

Spending the weekend in Sarasota with bell hooks who pushed me to take time off — even just for two days.

"You and that phone, girl. Who are you texting with? No, it’s the camera! I’m not going to smile." -bell hooks

Wow. 

5,777 notes

I need the gay community to STOP comparing our struggle to the Black Civil Rights Movement. You DON’T get to draw that comparison and then remain SILENT when the civil rights of Black teens are being violated. I mean, where the fuck are y’all?!?! Yay! For Ellen Page coming out at an lgbt youth conference. I was there. I sang right after. But THAT should not have been our focus yesterday. How in the hell are we having conferences to inspire our youth to live their truths and then have absolutely nothing to offer to THIS conversation???? Dear White Gays, I am HEARTBROKEN by your continued silence on these issues and I DO NOT give you permission to high jack the Civil Rights Movement while simultaneously IGNORING the inequalites that youth of color face every fucking day. It is culturally insensitive to do so and we are either fighting for EQUALITY for ALL or we aren’t. As an LGBT woman of color, I am having an extremely difficult time grasping WHY Matthew Shephard’s life is so much more valuable than Trayvon’s or Jordan’s????!?!?! Help me understand, y’all! Help me understand.

6,190 notes

It’s all about falling in love with yourself and sharing that love with someone who appreciates you, rather than looking for love to compensate for a self love deficit.
Eartha Kitt (via unfreshed)

(Source: pink-vulva)

34,212 notes

The Negro artist works against an undertow of sharp criticism and misunderstanding from his own group and unintentional bribes from the whites. “Oh, be respectable, write about nice people, show how good we are,” say the Negroes. “Be stereotyped, don’t go too far, don’t shatter our illusions about you, don’t amuse us too seriously. We will pay you,” say the whites….An artist must be free to choose what he does, certainly, but he must also never be afraid to do what he must choose….We younger Negro artists who create now intend to express our individual dark-skinned selves without fear or shame. If white people are pleased we are glad. If they are not, it doesn’t matter. We know we are beautiful. And ugly too…. If colored people are pleased we are glad. If they are not, their displeasure doesn’t matter either. We build our temples for tomorrow, strong as we know how, and we stand on top of the mountain, free within ourselves.

Langston Hughes, The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain, 1926

(via zeram)

this was one of the first Black cultural theory text that i ever read and it still blows my mind. i am such a historian. love the classics.

(via wrcsolace)

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Identifying as a person of color in solidarity with other people of color says ‘hey, my people have been oppressed by White people, maybe in a different time and space than your people, but we can work in solidarity.’ The identification needs to carry some degree of humility, and a deeper commitment to allyship . The POC umbrella is not an excuse to disavow the ways we benefit from various racial structures and sit idly by as our communities reap advantages from racism towards other people of color.

Black-Asian solidarity in the US, for instance, is hard to find and it will continue to be difficult to build if we continue to use the uncritical ‘POC’ label. Rather, we can use ‘POC’ as a way of reflecting on our different racial histories and building coalitions in our struggles and their difference. POC is a term for building solidarity between movements, not a movement in itself. That distinction is important.

Janani, Assistant Editor, Black Girl Dangerous. Read the whole thing here. (via filnana)


“How do we, as politicized people of color, acknowledge the very limits of the term ‘people of color’ and the way it can mask our actual racial situations?  For example, why do we keep using the phrase ‘communities of color’ as targets of police and state violence when we primarily mean Black and Latino folks?  What races are we trying to contain in the word ‘brown’?  Why are we afraid to point to the specificities of racism?  Do we think it will divide us?  Do we think we are really not capable of understanding and working from the different ways we experience racism? “ (via nepantlastrategies)

1,701 notes

qlicpress:

Black HERstory Month:  Mabel Hampton. Harlem Renaissance dancer, lesbian activist and philanthropist. Mabel lived and loved with her partner Lillian for almost 50years before Lillian died. An interviewer once asked Mabel, “When did you come out of the closet?” Her response: “Come OUT? I was never IN!”  #qwoc #qpoc #blacklesbian #blackhistorymonth #queer #mabelhampton

qlicpress:

Black HERstory Month:
Mabel Hampton. Harlem Renaissance dancer, lesbian activist and philanthropist. Mabel lived and loved with her partner Lillian for almost 50years before Lillian died. An interviewer once asked Mabel, “When did you come out of the closet?” Her response: “Come OUT? I was never IN!”
#qwoc #qpoc #blacklesbian #blackhistorymonth #queer #mabelhampton

203 notes

From my other spot…

youngblackandvegan:

queennubian:

poc-creators:

Because of them we can merch.  

Preorder the Book at $65

The Dream Journals are $12

The Calendar is $15

The Gear is between $45 to something, I think some of the tees sold out but check the website.

The Posters and believe me there are TONNES OF THOSE are $20 each

I for one have DESIGNS on the books, especially the journal, several posters and the tshirts

boooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooost!!!!!!!

my soror Eunique Jones Gibson has done an amazing job with this campaign. an exemplification of black excellence, past, present and future. make sure you support guys! 

1,560 notes

quads-for-the-gods:

bellecs:

winningthebattleloosingthewar:

On the morning of September 4, 1957, fifteen-year-old Dorothy Counts set out on a harrowing path toward Harding High, where-as the first African American to attend the all-white school – she was greeted by a jeering swarm of boys who spat, threw trash, and yelled epithets at her as she entered the building.

Charlotte Observer photographer Don Sturkey captured the ugly incident on film, and in the days that followed, the searing image appeared not just in the local paper but in newspapers around the world.

People everywhere were transfixed by the girl in the photograph who stood tall, her five-foot-ten-inch frame towering nobly above the mob that trailed her. There, in black and white, was evidence of the brutality of racism, a sinister force that had led children to torment another child while adults stood by. While the images display a lot of evils: prejudice, ignorance, racism, sexism, inequality, it also captures true strength, determination, courage and inspiration.

Here she is, age 70, still absolutely elegant and poised.

she deserves to be re-blogged. 

(Source: cloudyskiesandcatharsis)

243,928 notes

glittersexhappiness:

Happy Black Month Ya’ll!!! Take this month to learn something new about yourself and/or others! ✊

glittersexhappiness:

Happy Black Month Ya’ll!!! Take this month to learn something new about yourself and/or others! ✊

15 notes

vintageblackglamour:

Langston Hughes was born 112 years ago today in Joplin, Missouri. This photo was taken by Nickolas Muray, a Hungarian-American photographer who was also an Olympic fencer, in 1923 when Mr. Hughes was about 21 years old.

vintageblackglamour:

Langston Hughes was born 112 years ago today in Joplin, Missouri. This photo was taken by Nickolas Muray, a Hungarian-American photographer who was also an Olympic fencer, in 1923 when Mr. Hughes was about 21 years old.

3,232 notes